Xbox Series S Review:

This Xbox Series S review was originally published on November 5, 2020.

It’s worth noting that the Xbox Series S is one of the oddest gaming consoles I’ve seen in recent memory.

As a result, it’s a less expensive and less powerful version of Microsoft’s flagship Xbox Series X system – the kind of thing you’d expect to see after a console’s first few years on the market, like the Wii Mini or PS2 Slim.

So here it is: a sleek, white box that will be released on the same day as its larger, beefier sibling despite being much smaller in size.

The Xbox Series S is significantly less expensive than the Xbox Series X because it costs $300 rather than $500. Money, on the other hand, is never a guarantee of quality or value.

Given the difficulty of forecasting the future, I am cautiously optimistic about the Series S after putting it through its paces. No, it lacks the same processing power as the Xbox Series X.

Its hardware limits what it can do in terms of performance, storage, backwards compatibility, and media. Despite this, it’s still a very powerful console with a huge library of games to choose from – not to mention that it plays streaming media very well, so it won’t take up too much space in your home.

Affordability and price

There are several ways to get started with today’s video games for less than $300. One of them is the Xbox Series S. It’s also much easier to find in stock than an Xbox Series X replacement.

If you don’t want to buy it outright, you can get an Xbox Series S for less than $300 with the Xbox All Access membership service. A 24-month Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscription that includes access to the Xbox Cloud Gaming streaming service costs $25 per month.

This grants you access to the console as well as a large library of games.

It’s worth noting that Xbox is expected to release new hardware this year, so keep an eye out.

Advantages and disadvantages

Pros

• Exceptional game selection

• Consistent performance

• Sleek and quiet design

• Relatively low cost

Cons

• Not particularly future-proof

• Graphics and storage constraints

Design

The experience of taking the Xbox Series S out of the box was eye-opening. The new system measures 10.8 x 5.9 x 2.5 inches, which is smaller than the PS5, PS4, Xbox Series X, and Xbox One. This device, which is roughly the same size as the Wii U, can play a lot more games.)

A giraffe is depicted in Tom’s Guide’s review of the Xbox One S.

The top of the console, in contrast to the rest of the frame, has a round black vent that adds visual interest.

It has rubber feet on one of the horizontal and one of the vertical surfaces, regardless of how you position it.

Despite the fact that “the console is so small,” I was astounded by how much of a difference the size of the Series S made.

Despite the fact that my entertainment centre is already crammed with technology, I was able to easily fit the Series S in.

When I finished testing it, I slid it between a large TV stand and a cluttered dresser in my bedroom. Even my domestic partner, who is opposed to gaming consoles in the bedroom due to their enormous size, reluctantly accepted this device.

Ports

This is a simple port system, similar to the Xbox Series X. The device’s front panel includes a USB-A connector, a power button, and a pairing button. Because there is no disc drive, the rest of the front panel of the Series S is empty.

In the back of this model, you’ll find two more USB-A ports, an HDMI port, an Ethernet port, and a power outlet. I was pleasantly surprised to see an Ethernet connector, given that that’s usually the first thing to go in low-cost devices.

The same issue that I had with the Xbox Series X applies here: there are no USB-C ports. This appears to be a significant omission for consoles that are expected to last five to seven years.

New USB-C dongle-based gaming accessories take advantage of USB-faster C’s charging and data transfer rates. USB-C. For the time being, USB-A connectors will suffice, but the lack of USB-C ports is a major oversight.

Interface

You’ve already used the Xbox Series S’s UI if you’ve used the Xbox One’s. That’s not an evasive remark; it’s a genuine observation. Despite recent updates to Microsoft’s Xbox store, the user interface hasn’t changed much in years.

When you first boot up the system, you’ll see your most recent games and activities on the Home screen. If you scroll down, you’ll see the Store, Media, and Game Pass options. By pressing the Xbox button on the controller, you can navigate through your games and applications.

You’ll be able to browse your entire library, receive system notifications, manage your friends list, and view your achievements, among other things.

It’s pointless to go into great detail about the Xbox Series S interface because you’ve most likely already seen it (or something similar).

It isn’t the most visually appealing interface, but once you get the hang of it, it gets you to your destination quickly. As an added bonus, if you’ve recently used the Xbox One, you’ll be able to jump right in.

That’s what makes the Series S UI so good: it’s always consistent. Microsoft’s online store and Xbox apps for PCs and Android devices have been completely redesigned in recent months.

The Xbox Series X, Xbox Series S, Xbox One, Xbox PC software, and Xbox Android app now share many features. Because Microsoft is building one, you will be able to access the Xbox environment from virtually anywhere.

Performance

With all due respect, the Xbox Series S does not have the same processing power as the Xbox Series X. To understand why, you must first familiarise yourself with the hardware specifications of the two consoles.

The Series X model includes a 12-teraflop graphics processor, 16GB of RAM, and 1TB of SSD storage, whereas the Series S model has only 10GB of RAM and no disc drive at all.

The majority of Xbox Series X games will run at 4K resolution and 60 frames per second, but some titles may support resolutions as high as 8K and frame rates as high as 120 frames per second. Although a frame rate of 120 fps is theoretically possible, the Xbox Series S’s game resolution is limited to 1440p.

Without going into too much detail, the Xbox Series S is far less powerful than the Series X, which explains why it costs so much less. The Series S’s low specifications may be an issue or even a non-issue depending on your setup and intended use.

I was able to determine how well the Xbox One S Series performed using three different methods. Gears 5, Maneater, Ori and the Will of the Wisps, and Yakuza: Like a Dragon are all listed as “optimised for Xbox X/S” on Microsoft’s website.

Microsoft guarantees that the Xbox Series S and Series X versions of these titles will have better lighting, texturing, frame rates, and other visual effects than the Xbox One versions.

Verdict

In our Xbox Series S review, we looked at how this sleek, approachable console could be just the thing for young, casual, or budget-conscious gamers who want the latest and greatest games but aren’t quite ready to spend $500.

On the other hand, if you’re planning to buy an Xbox Series X (or already have a powerful gaming PC), the Series S makes an excellent backup console for a bedroom or office, especially since your library and save data can travel with you wherever you go.

The Xbox Series S is far too niche to recommend to everyone. If you have a high-end 4K TV, you may be better off with the Xbox Series X — especially since the Series S, with its inferior hardware, may be less suited to play next-gen titles as they become more demanding in the coming years.

Its lack of a disc drive limits its backwards compatibility, and its hard drive will quickly fill up. Still, if those concerns aren’t dealbreakers, the $200 you’ll save can buy a lot of games.

In our Xbox Series S review, we looked at how this sleek, approachable console could be just the thing for young, casual, or budget-conscious gamers who want the latest and greatest games but aren’t quite ready to spend $500.

On the other hand, if you’re planning to buy an Xbox Series X (or already have a powerful gaming PC), the Series S makes an excellent backup console for a bedroom or office, especially since your library and save data can travel with you wherever you go.

The Xbox Series S is far too niche to recommend to everyone. If you have a high-end 4K TV, you may be better off with the Xbox Series X — especially since the Series S, with its inferior hardware, may be less suited to play next-gen titles as they become more demanding in the coming years.

Its lack of a disc drive limits its backwards compatibility, and its hard drive will quickly fill up. Still, if those concerns aren’t dealbreakers, the $200 you’ll save can buy a lot of games.

In our Xbox Series S review, we looked at how this sleek, approachable console could be just the thing for young, casual, or budget-conscious gamers who want the latest and greatest games but aren’t quite ready to spend $500.

On the other hand, if you’re planning to buy an Xbox Series X (or already have a powerful gaming PC), the Series S makes an excellent backup console for a bedroom or office, especially since your library and save data can travel with you wherever you go.

The Xbox Series S is far too niche to recommend to everyone. If you have a high-end 4K TV, you may be better off with the Xbox Series X — especially since the Series S, with its inferior hardware, may be less suited to play next-gen titles as they become more demanding in the coming years.

Its lack of a disc drive limits its backwards compatibility, and its hard drive will quickly fill up. Still, if those concerns aren’t dealbreakers, the $200 you’ll save can buy a lot of games.

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